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Generic Logos - How To Spot And Avoid Them


We have seen logo designs and feel like we have seen them before, or they do not seem too unique. It is where you have probably come across a generic logo design that is not doing much for your brand.
Your logo design is often the first interaction that potential customers have with your brand that is why it is important for your logo design be effective. A logo design is much more than just an image or a text which states that it has to be original and creative. For a brand that wants to attract customers and stand out from the competition must have a compelling and attractive logo design that can deliver the right message to the audience.

Logo designers know and value the importance of professional logo design to any business either it is large, small or just a startup. It represents the company, it tells their story and symbolizes their brand identity to the world. No matter how good your products or services are, if your logo design is poor, you are going to have a rigid time attracting customers towards your brand. Yes, it is necessary for the products to deliver value but a brand must first attract the customers through a unique logo design.

What Is Generic Logo Design?

Even the most experienced logo designers in the industry encounter challenges when it comes to creating highly professional and affordable logo design for their clients. Generic logo design is overused and clichéd logo designs that are often seen in most of the designs like,

§  Abstract logo designs
§  Inside Box logo designs
§  Swoosh People logo designs
§  Word marks logo designs

Industries like accounting, automotive, wellness, love, nature and photography have these generic logo designs. When logo designers use the same concepts in a logo design over and over again, then they are arguably no longer visual and are not able to make their trademark.

Avoiding Generic Logo Design:

Maintaining quality standards are must in your design process. Clichéd and overused design concepts are gone past. Learn to:

§  Make your design unique to your own creative ideas.
§  Not use stock images, clip-art or purchased vectors in logo design, illustration design or icon design contest.
§  Acquire proper license when needed while making any purchase for the design.
§  Do not submit placeholder designs or use personal watermarks.
§  Do not Copy, Plagiarize or Steal Someone Else’s Logo Design.
§  Do not have a Vague or Overly-Complex Design.
§  Keep things simple, clear and meaningful.
§  Choose balanced and legible typefaces that can both be read in extreme sizes.
§  Do not Design for building your portfolio Instead of the Client’s Needs.
§  Remember that it is not all about you.

What’s next?

Creative and appealing are two words that should fit a professional logo design, neither of which apply to the overused, clichéd, swoosh around a globe mark. Professional logo design is far away from common design elements and often employ safe and familiar symbols that give them an original twist. That “original twist” is a challenge for a designer where the designer takes the literal concept and making it original by adding creativity, style and the brand’s message.

About Loius Martin:
As a Marketing Manager, Loius approaches Digital Marketing not only as a profession but a creative thinking process. He knows well to connect all the points of a brand and make it appear well. With a passion for writing about content marketing, design and development he has been writing blogs since time. Get more of his articles @loiusmartin1


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