Friday, July 27, 2018

Nice guys DO NOT finish last


Gratitude goes a long, long way in the nice equation. You can be satisfied anywhere along the path of life. It doesn't mean that you are complacent. It means that you are grateful for where you are ... AND you are pursuing more/better/different. More money, better relationships, different business ... always striving to improve and move forward. That's nice.


Nice guys do not finish last. 

Actually, nice guys finish first with a ton of cheerleaders celebrating with you. Nice gets it done. Nice moves you forward with gusto. Nice keeps you in a place of integrity with yourself. Nice enrolls people to help you accomplish your goals. Nice keeps you moving in the direction of your purpose. Nice smooths the path for you. Greases the wheel. Levels the playing field. Keeps you smiling.

Nice is a four letter word to some people. There is a nasty rumor that nice is just another word for doormat. Nice in no way means that you are leaving yourself open to being used or abused ~ it is simply a way to stay in your own integrity and take care of yourself … first! This book explores and expands on the idea that staying in the nice zone is the most beneficial thing you can do for yourself and your life.

This is not a dress rehearsal. As the lyrics from "Breathe" by Anna Nalick so beautifully expresses, "life's like an hourglass, glued to the table." This is your shot. It goes by too fast to waste time. You have things to do! Big things.

Moving forward is the only thing that matters. You know that's true. You also know it's true that if you are not moving forward, you are moving backward. There is no stable ground … no sitting in a comfort zone and just hanging out. If you are not growing, you are decaying.

Being nice truly does provide a valuable assist to actually moving forward and getting what it is you want out of this life.

This book will get you on the path.



Russell Vann
Author
GhettoBastard1968@gmail.com
PO Box 1223
Conifer Colorado 80433-1223
USA

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Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Transcending the "I"



The characteristic mark of substantial change is that the object undergoing the change does not survive that change or persist through it, but is destroyed in the process.  – Aristotle


What is our never-ending focus on working hard to achieve the "good life" getting us? America, once the healthiest nation on earth, now ranks 27th - below all European nations and many third world countries. 

In her book, Transcending the I, Carol Grojean invites us to join her profound journey into her experience of self as she "woke up" from her way of living through external, socialized definition. Her journey began one day when, while exploring the dissatisfaction of her life, she participated in a workshop with a friend. Sitting on the floor in a circle, everyone was asked the question, "What do you pretend?" Her answer surprised her and sent her on a journey to redefine who she truly is.

"I pretend that getting up every morning and getting ready for work, the kids off to school, followed by 10+ hours sitting at a desk or in meetings, inside four walls not even aware of the weather outside let alone life, arguing for some reason or another and thinking that whatever the subject is, it is the end of the world if I don't get my way, then coming home late, usually too late for dinner with the family, and plopping on the couch in front of the TV with a big glass of wine to decompress so I can sleep

– I pretend this is a meaningful life."


While subjective well-being can be hard to define and even harder to measure, the 2017 World Happiness Report continues to demonstrate, year after year, that measures of happiness such as economic, social, and health are important to everyone, yet nothing is as important as mental health, or eudaimonia, that sense of meaning and purpose in one's life.

It appears that after 20 years in a large corporation, Carol had found herself senior in an organization and earning a healthy income, but unfulfilled in purpose and meaning. Feeling there should be something more to life than long hours, little time for family or friends, and full of meaningless things attempting to satiate her growing discontent, Carol took a leap-of-faith into the world of academia to better understand the modern society she came from.

The focus of Transcending the I as Carol's Ph.D. research was to leverage autoethnography (using yourself as a mirror of the larger culture you are studying) not only as a method of inquiry but also as a catalyst for experiencing transformational change within one person's psyche through research outcomes focused on answering the question:

How can the experiences of contemplative silence, mindful awareness, and indigenous ceremony facilitate transformational learning in support of human growth towards wholeness and interdependence?


Through journaling, introspection, and storytelling, Carol approached inquiry and analysis as a ceremony by which to reveal habits and patterns of my her of being which mirrored the larger culture she researched. Transcending the I is Carol's story.

Russell Vann
Author
GhettoBastard1968@gmail.com
PO Box 1223
Conifer Colorado 80433-1223
USA

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Monday, July 23, 2018

Are your children suffering from bullies?


Stronger than Fear is the story of young Christopher and his beloved dog, Loki. Loki lives in so much fear of four-legged neighborhood bullies that he stops walking with Christopher to school. But when Christopher gets a black eye from a bully of his own, Loki must choose between protecting his friend and avoiding his bullies. They learn that, together, they are stronger than fear. Children will learn through this story that they can conquer any fear with love and support from friends and family.
Russell Vann
Author
GhettoBastard1968@gmail.com
PO Box 1223
Conifer Colorado 80433-1223
USA

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Sunday, July 22, 2018

Don't get sick over healthcare


Six Simple Steps to Take Control of Your Healthcare

for More Confidence, Support and a Healthier Future


Nobody loves going to the doctor. The healthcare system is complicated, confusing, and often frustrating. It's difficult to make an appointment, you have long waits to see a doctor who hardly has time to see you, and medical insurance is a confusing nightmare. Who needs it? You do! Every single one of us needs to see doctors, whether to treat an illness or prevent one. Even when you're not sick, you may be unsure where to turn to get the best care and advice.In Don't Get Sick Over Your Healthcare, Dale White, an expert at navigating the complex healthcare system, presents a way to achieve better health and more happiness for yourself and your loved ones.  In his book, he demonstrates six simple steps that teach you to:
  • Better prepare for your appointment, so you can feel confident
  • Get the support you need to feel empowered about your healthcare
  • Save time and money (and frustration!) by reducing billing errors
  • Be proactive in your approach to healthcare, for better overall health
You and your loved ones deserve the best healthcare experience so that your futures are as bright and healthy as possible. Taking control of your healthcare shouldn't make you feel sick--and now it doesn't have to.


Russell Vann
Author
GhettoBastard1968@gmail.com
PO Box 1223
Conifer Colorado 80433-1223
USA

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Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Those S and ES Endings by Mary Deal



These endings have always troubled me until I finally decided to get it right. Compare the versions and pick out the correct usages in this name ending with the letter s.

The Joneses came for dinner.
The Jones’s came for dinner.
The Jones came for dinner.

John Joneses car stalled.
John Jones car stalled.
John Jones’s car stalled.

That Jones’s girl.
That Joneses girl.
That Jones girl.

The correct sentences are:

The Joneses came for dinner.
John Jones’s car stalled.
That Jones girl.

Some tips:

When a name ends with an s, and when speaking of the family as a group, add es, as in Joneses.
When speaking about something John Jones owned, it is his property and, therefore, an apostrophe and s shows ownership, as in Jones’s.
When speaking about a person in the singular, use only the name Jones.
However, when speaking about a group of girls all named Jones, you would write that sentence: The Jones girls. Notice that the name stays the same but the s is added to the word girl, stating more than one exists with that name.


Mary Deal

Author, Painter, Photographer
Eric Hoffer Book Award Winner
National Indie Excellence Book Awards Finalist (past)
Pushcart Prize Nominee
Global eBook Awards Nominee
2014 National Indie Excellence Book Awards Finalist
Global eBook Awards Bronze
Global eBook Awards Silver
Art Gallery: http://www.MaryDealFineArt.com
Gift Gallery: zazzle.com/IslandImageGallery*