Thursday, October 19, 2017

CONTEST- No Fee poetry)


Prize: Autographed copy of I Passed This Way by Patricia Crandall (a book of poetry), and a New York Bestseller under $25.00.

Write a poem about nature. The poem needs to be under 32 lines or it won’t be accepted. Keep it clean. Any style.

Judges:
Patricia Crandall, author of Melrose, Then and Now, a historical volume, I Passed This Way, a poetry collection, The Dog Men, a thriller, Tales of an Upstate New York Bottle Miner, non-fiction, and Pat's Collectibles, a collection of short stories. She is writing a y/a thriller about child sex trafficking titled The Red Gondola and the Cova.

Linda Barnett-Johnson, Virtual Assistant for authors. She writes for Writers on the Move, has been published on Long Story Short and other online ezines as well as a story in The Color Gallery, an anthology of World’s Great Short Stories. She enjoys writing short stories and poetry.

The contest starts now, so get your creative writing caps on.

Please post it on Patricia Crandall’s Author Page – https://www.facebook.com/pcrandall123

The contest will end December 31, 2017. The winning poem will be announced January 31, 2018


Tuesday, October 17, 2017

A Twist of Fate Changed their Lives






Judith Finneren has created a beautiful book, a deeply engaging, heartfelt journey as she navigates the unknown water of profound loss. Remember His Name"is touching, inspirational and a true gift for the loving and healing heart.  —Kristine Carlson, Don't Sweat the Small Stuff books
This is a book about hope, tragedy, healing and forgiveness.  It is a personal story of a woman who experienced the sudden tragic loss of her spouse of almost 37 years. You will read of her courage and strength as she stumbled through the first few months, learning to accept the reality of what happened.

Remember His Name:  Conquering Sorrow, Accepting Joy is a book about hope, tragedy, healing and forgiveness.  It is a personal story of a woman who experienced the sudden tragic loss of her spouse of almost 37 years. You will read of her courage and strength as she stumbled through the first few months, learning to accept the reality of what happened.

      She shares her private personal thoughts and feelings as she traveled a journey she never thought she would ever face.  She is candid and purely honest as she speaks of her experiences.  From the heart, you are there with her, feeling and experiencing the horror as well as the joy as time goes on and she shares with you the steps she took and things she discovered that helped heal the pain of her grief.

      Judith and Ralph met in 1973, fell in love, got married, had two beautiful children, raised them in a rural suburb of Detroit, Michigan, sent them off to college, watched them become independent successful young people and now as a couple experiencing empty nest and nearing retirement began planning their future.  The summer evenings were just right for swinging on their new wooden swing.  They often found themselves reminiscing about the past and planning for the future.

      Then suddenly one beautiful summer evening, all that changed.

      Spiritual events, synchronicity, meditation, journaling and the importance of connecting with others, stepping outside of her comfort zone helped her learn to walk the path of grief. Then finally, she stepped into a new life.  Letting the spirit of her beloved live within her, while letting his physical being go is a philosophy Judith lives by daily.  Always keeping in mind the last words, her husband Ralph wrote to their daughter Holli in an e-mail, "The Future is Bright."
PO Box 1223
Conifer Colorado 80433-1223
USA

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Monday, October 16, 2017

Character Titles by Mary Deal



  

Although many people claim only five to seven main titles of distinctions for types of characters, you will hear characters referred to by many different terms. What follows a list of how all characters may be titled.

Protagonist – The main character of your story and can be either male or female. It can also be an animal or any person or entity around whom the story revolves. The protagonist must want something or have something to prove. The protagonist doesn’t always have to be liked.

Antagonist – The person that opposes what the Protagonist wishes to overcome. An antagonist need not be a person. It can be a stubborn obstacle or situation.

Secondary Character – Any character that has a fairly prominent place in the story but is not the protagonist or antagonist, yet stands out over all the rest.

Incidental Character – Those story people who remain in the background and only show up to round out a scene or offer a bit of story detail that others did not know. These characters are usually found by the protagonist along the way to overcoming the obstacle they wish to master.

Heroine – A female who brings about the story’s climax and denouement. Usually the female protagonist.

Hero – A male character who saves the day, also, usually the story’s protagonist.

Villain – Can be male or female. The term usually applies to a human being and is most always the antagonist, though a few stories are written with the villain as protagonist. Villain is usually always the one standing in the way of the protagonist achieving her or his goals.

Mentor – A character who could be behind the scenes but who guides or advises the protagonist or other important character.

Foil – A character used to contrast another character to help establish personality.

Point of View (POV) Character – The character through whom the story is told. Applies to nearly all stories except those written from multiple points of view, as in Omniscient points of view.

Major Characters – All characters who are active throughout the story.

Minor Characters – Those in the background of the action, sometimes used as filler to round out the action.

Round Characters – Those whose personalities have been fully developed in the story, even though they may not be a prominent character. Many minor characters are rounded to give credence to what they do in the story, no matter how small their action.

Flat Characters – Those with little to no action in the story, have little to no personality development, and make few appearances. All stories have these people and the stories would not be the same without them.

Dynamic Characters – Usually those characters around whom the story evolves. Even though a character may make one appearance, or speak only one line of dialogue, it impacts the story in a way that the story would not be the same without their appearance.

Love Interest Character – Is usually someone in whom the protagonist is in love, but may apply to anyone in the story opposite any character, as long as the love interest portion impacts what the protagonist needs to accomplish.
For example, the protagonist may love a person who is already part of a couple with someone else. In the end, after trying to gain the love interest’s attention, once having solved the main problem needing to be accomplished, the protagonist realizes he or she is better off without that person in their lives. These characters’ lives can play out in any varied scenario of results.

Static Characters – People who never change throughout the story. Can be any character in the story. Their unchanging nature gives grounding to the main characters and adds greater depth to any character’s character arc. Can also refer to faces in the crowd.

Stock Characters – Story people used as fillers. They usually have no name and no real purpose in the story other than momentary, if that much, like walk-ons in a film. They pass in the background, enhance the background setting, but we never see them again.

All stories do not employ all of these people. However, as you create your plots, you will see the need to understand the characters you’re creating and their purposes.


 Mary Deal

Author, Painter, Photographer
Eric Hoffer Book Award Winner
National Indie Excellence Book Awards Finalist (past)
Pushcart Prize Nominee
Global eBook Awards Nominee
2014 National Indie Excellence Book Awards Finalist
Global eBook Awards Bronze
Global eBook Awards Silver
Art Gallery: http://www.MaryDealFineArt.com
Gift Gallery: zazzle.com/IslandImageGallery*

Monday, October 9, 2017

Building a Story by Mary Deal



  

An example of how to begin a new story when your Muse has taken a vacation.

A friend of mine—I’ll call her Judy—had written a novel and was in the process of sending it out to literary agents seeking representation. She and I knew that first-time authors typically needed to have two or more completed and polished manuscripts in hand.
Publishers do not make large profits on an unknown writer’s first book but on subsequent publications instead. Money is spent on publicity for the first book to establish a reputation for an author and build readership. With these aspects already established, on subsequent books, larger profits are realized.
Too, publishers are more apt to believe that a writer is capable of turning out numbers of books if they did so of their own volition and not because a publisher waits with bated breath for another manuscript. Having more than one book shows true intent as a writer.
So, Judy needed to write another story, and fast. She had just completed the rigors of editing and deep polishing the first manuscript and felt burned out. I suggested she take a breather for a week or two; maybe even get away for a vacation. She is not one to shy away from responsibility, so she pleaded with me to help her find a way to conjure another plot because her muse had taken the vacation for her.
I never thought about how to start a new story. My stories just rolled out whenever I allowed myself to think. Then I remembered a few techniques I used in establishing characters in my first novel and passed those steps along to her.
The one presented here is the procedure that worked for her. She took more than a month conjuring characters and, not surprisingly, the story unfolded as she went along. By the end of three months, she had completed the first draft of her second novel.
Something happened along the way. Her muse evidently decided she liked the excitement of the new story and returned promptly from vacation. In following the steps given below, Judy came up with an idea for a sequel to her newly finished story and then decided to make it a serial.

* * * * *

Your hero or heroine should be the strongest character in your story. Let’s give your main characters the types of personalities that will fit their roles.
Imagine a person you’d like to have in one of your stories. From that mental image, build a character. She or he will probably be your protagonist. This may change, so beyond recording the character’s physical attributes, do not think further into the story.
If you have written a short story and identify a protagonist, you can use that character to help flesh out another one. However, the technique presented here works best when starting fresh with a character about whom you know nothing. Then you’re less likely to follow the plot line of the other story already written.
Have a sort of feel for a person and start simply by listing physical attributes: age, color of eyes, skin tone, hair color and any other details you feel you wish the person to have.
At this point, do not list anything like the fact that the lady changes hair color frequently, or has a nail-biting neurosis. This has little to do with establishing the basics of physical image. If something extra does come up in creating the character, then your Muse is beginning to feed you details of a story you have yet to consciously realize. How exciting is that? If this extra information may be too good to pass up, then you can add it, perhaps in a separate list for personality. Be simple in the primary description and make a separate list of added details as something you may include later.
Next, give the person just enough of a life so that you know what makes your character’s personality unique.

What does she or he do for a living?
How many other family members?
What are her or his best personality attributes, and worst ones?
What other relatives closely share this character’s life and how does your character interact with them?
What delicious secrets does your character hide?

Another example: Give your character habits like a facial tic or nail-biting. Try to conjure why she or he has it? Is it the result of some repressed emotion? Is it from some shock long ago? How does this unnerving habit affect people presently in the character’s life? What crisis from her past should she have to work through to eliminate the tic? Who else is involved in why she may have such a habit? If nothing like this comes to mind for your character, don’t worry. Something else is on the way!
I like the part about the secrets most. Most people hide things they wouldn’t want the world to know about themselves. Draw it out of your story people. Find some shocking information, juicy tidbits around which to build your plot, around which to motivate your characters.
See where this is going? By the time you’ve got the first character established, you will have introduced us to other people in his or her life.
Next, choose one of those secondary people and build another character sketch. You may already know which character will interact most with your protagonist. It doesn’t have to be a love-interest either. The next character can be a public figure the protagonist tries to emulate, or someone who has been stalking her, or a neighbor, or anyone among the characters who people your plot.
For the next character, you do not have to use any particular person included with the sketch of your main character. You can start fresh again and build a whole new person. Something in that creation will tell you how to bring this person together with your main character and the others.
Follow this procedure for each character whether or not they immediately interact with the main character. Have faith. Your Muse understands you need characters that will ultimately interact, so create them as they come to mind. Trust yourself!
Finally, your characters will tell you a story as you create them. Begin to write about how these people interact. By the time you get this far, you will know where your story is going. You will know your plot!
Trust the process. You will have conjured something important to say about these people, their lives and their impact on one another and the outcome.
Write without editing. Let your mind wander from the rational to the absurd. As you write, you’ll find yourself choosing which path you wish the story to follow.
Ultimately, you may not use most of the information you pack into your character sketches. However, because you have taken the time to build your characters, you will know how they react in all the circumstances presented in your plot. A morally upstanding person reacts one way to a certain occurrence; a frivolous person reacts a completely different way to the same situation. You will know these people because in building character sketches you unknowingly create their morals, ethics, and motivations, which will surely spice up your plot.

Mary Deal

Author, Painter, Photographer
Eric Hoffer Book Award Winner
National Indie Excellence Book Awards Finalist (past)
Pushcart Prize Nominee
Global eBook Awards Nominee
2014 National Indie Excellence Book Awards Finalist
Global eBook Awards Bronze
Global eBook Awards Silver
Art Gallery: http://www.MaryDealFineArt.com
Gift Gallery: zazzle.com/IslandImageGallery*




Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Healing issues that impact your life...



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Healing issues that impact your life...
"I absolutely love this book!! I have the divine pleasure of getting to work with Kristine, and who she is shines through in this book. She has such a gift for articulating the truths that allow us to move from fear and ego, into light and love. And I love her reference stories in the book that help show how these healing modalities have worked for others and how they can work for you. A must read! And if you can, book a session with her! She is truly incredible." - Amazon Reader


Are you tired of feeling consumed by anger or resentment about your past?  Do you suffer from addictions or other health problems that seem linked to a longtime pattern of stress, anxiety, or depression

You can transform your health and your life. Once you understand how negative emotions associated with trauma, anger, and fear are making you sick, you can learn to release them and find true healing and happiness.In Living through Choice, gifted spiritual counselor and hypnotherapist Kristine Ovsepian, MA, C.Ht., shares simple yet powerful tools to reunite you with your authentic self, and guides you to: 

*     Understand how your past (in this lifetime and beyond) influences your present 
*      Overcome stress, anxiety, and depression 
*   Banish anger and resentment to forgive yourself and others 
*      Heal addictions and other illnesses 
*      Manifest spiritual, emotional, and physical healing

Your mind is a powerful tool for healing, and you can learn to use it to transform pain and suffering into love, health, and prosperity. All you need is a willingness to find healing on all levels, and a guide to show you the way there.
PO Box 1223, Conifer, CO 80433

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Monday, September 25, 2017

Unseen Background Details by Mary Deal

 
 
As a writer, you may find that TV characters can be emotionally flat time and again. What sets them apart, even what gets the viewer to like them, is that we can see them. We see their facial expressions and how they react to other people and occurrences. We see their actions, which express motivations and emotion. We see the background scenery and how they act and react in such a setting.
What we see on TV or in a film is exactly what many writers fail to include in their stories.
Details we see in a picture don't have to be explained because we see them. When writing our stories and books, we must skillfully describe the important silent background details for the reader.
A simplified example: If the reader doesn't know the character is caught out in a rainstorm, how will the reader know anything except that the character is walking down a street?
We must describe the setting. If it was raining, don't stop there.
 
Was it a thunderstorm or simply sprinkling?
Did the character get caught without a raincoat and umbrella?
Was the sky dark, or was the sun shining through the rain?
Was the wind blowing?
Who else was nearby and how did they react to the rain?
 
We writers must include in our written works anything that might otherwise be seen when viewing the same scene on TV or in a film. Yet, we cannot over-do the details by stopping the story and describing the background.
Every detail necessary should be woven into the action as long as it enhances the scene. Which do you prefer?
 
The sky was dark. Lightning lit up the distant sky. Thunder rolled. The wind was fierce. It bent her umbrella backwards. She discarded it. Rain pelted down. She wore a raincoat but was now getting drenched.
 
Or this:
 
When lightning flashed and thunder rolled again and the deluge came, she grabbed the collar of her raincoat, drew it up around her neck, and began running. Her umbrella bent backwards as the wind tore it from her hands. Her hair hung in loose wet ringlets as water streamed off the ends and ran down inside her collar. How did she ever let herself get caught alone on a dark street with wind strong enough to blow her over the side of the bridge? And why had that dark sedan slowed its speed to keep pace directly behind her?
 
The rule is never to stop the story to describe the background or scene, but to include the surroundings among the action performed by each character and as it affects that character.



LINK TO AMAZON AUTHOR PAGE


Author, Painter, Photographer
Eric Hoffer Book Award Winner
National Indie Excellence Book Awards Finalist (past)
Pushcart Prize Nominee
Global eBook Awards Nominee
2014 National Indie Excellence Book Awards Finalist
Global eBook Awards Bronze
Global eBook Awards Silver



Thursday, September 21, 2017

A magnificent time travel medical fantasy set in two different centuries





A magnificent time travel medical fantasy set in two different centuries
"Dr. Timothy Cook combines medical knowledge and personal experiences, within a refreshingly new fantasy tale that is like nothing you will have encountered before. Appealing to a wide-readership, this fascinating insight into the life of a Doctor is inspiring and illuminating, for it captures two very different time frames and experiences. Amid the spine-chilling suspense and engaging mystery is a heart-warming tale of two physicians connected across the ages with the same goal in mind. Compelling and profoundly insightful, the first book of Drachma is a stirring read. ~Luicinda





What does being a doctor really feel like? What is it like to get called out in the middle of the night to care for a desperately ill patient, to be the one everyone depends on? Bob Gilsen knows only too well. And what does a fifteenth-century physician, who gets called out in the middle of the night in winter, possibly have to offer his patient? This is the beginning of The Book of Drachma, a novel of medicine, murder, fantasy, and self-discovery, set in two times and places. It is a novel for the curious, for those who really wish to know what it means to be a doctor, in this, as well as past ages.