Tuesday, February 28, 2017

A journey to the door of death





The author's mind-bending descriptions, written as though they were happening in the here and now relate to events that millions of people have lived through and continue to experience during and after an unexpected health crisis. 
Read more.
This book is not only a riveting account of facts and events, but is one of personal experiences. The authors mind-bending descriptions, written as though they were happening in the here and now relate to events that millions of people have lived through and continue to experience during and after an unexpected health crisis. Similar experiences to those of the author happen to many others as they receive life-saving medical procedures in hospitals, clinics, at the scene of an accident in their own home or elsewhere. 

A Journey To The Door Of Death is the inside story of a physical catastrophe. A major focus in the book is the suffering experienced from the traumas of serious illness and life saving treatments. The author struggles to find meaning related to her suffering that might help others. 

Examples of the questions she explores are: 
  • How may traumatic medical events be experienced or reflected in the minds and bodies of people who experience them?
  • Can these experiences actually cause Post Traumatic Stress Disorder? What effects can can result spiritually and emotionally as a result of this type of trauma? 
  • Why do some people return to functional living while other do not? 
  • Can traumatic unexpected medical events create an existential crisis for the person experiencing them? 

A framework in the form of a model, emerged while the the book was being written and is fully described. This model has proved useful by helping people understand themselves and others and is explained in the book.


PO Box 1223, Conifer, CO 80433

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Monday, February 27, 2017

Tides of Change





Tides of Change is more than the love story of all time; it's a magnificent and thrilling adventure!    ---Kay Schlichting
"Tides of Change," Book One of "The Atlantis Chronicles" trilogy, begins far beneath the wild beauty of the Aegean Sea. Having survived one horrific cataclysm, a society as ancient as time now thrives untouched and undiscovered in blue waters once ruled by Poseidon.

Unknown to any but their Healer, a devastating secret threatens Atlantis with yet another extinction event. The matriarchal healing line, descended from Poseidon, no longer has an heir. In a desperate bid to ensure the continuance of their small, underwater community, Na-Kai eva Evenor, Most Sovereign Healer of Atlantis, unleashes a power the Healers have been expressly forbidden to use from the beginning of time.

Rising from the hidden depths of Atlantis, Na-Kai's telekinetic web of energy shimmers to a halt atop the jagged, volcanic cliffs of the exotic Greek island of Santorini.

Compelled from her hotel room to the very edge of the dark, windswept cliffs, Daria Caiden is trapped in the grasp of Na-Kai's relentless thought-form. Forced to dive from the precipice, Daria is pulled deep into the sapphire waters below. Floating in midnight quiet, she releases her last breath, and waits to die.

In one shattering moment,events are set into motion that will bring about catastrophic change. Changes that no one could foresee.

PO Box 1223, Conifer, CO 80433

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9 Tips for Beginners



Tip #1 – Store Your Notes
Usually when I see great writing tips, I have a file set up in Word called - what else? Writing Tips. You should have one too.
I copy and paste the advice into my file to refer to when needed. Included is the name of the author of the tidbit, in case I wish to quote them at some future time. Any handwritten notes I’ve made as reminders also get posted there.
Simply for clarification: When quoting another person’s writing or spoken word, up to only 100 words may be used and the originator of the piece must be given credit.

Tip #2 – Be Prepared to Write
Keep writing materials handy no matter where you go. That one stunning idea you forgot to write down but were sure you’d remember, and then forgot completely, could have been the one fragment that made your story memorable.
We writers should make notes everywhere we go. If without a laptop, we carry note pads and pens. JK Rowling used paper table napkins because she used to sit in her favorite cafe lamenting her jobless plight - till a shift happened in her mind and she started penning the notes for her first novel.
Ernest Hemingway wrote on table napkins when sitting in one of his two favorite bars in Cuba, El Floridita and La Bodequita del Medio.

Tip #3 - Beginnings
Avoid using empty words to start a story. Some empty words are:
There - refers to a place
They - refers to people
That - refers to a thing
It - refers to almost anything

Without first knowing the content of your story, we have no idea to what each refers. For example, one person may write:
There were four of them.
Without yet knowing the story, ask yourself: There? Where were they? Who were they? A better way to bring the action forward would be to say,
Four of them appeared.
Or get directly into the meat of your story and say.
Four men dressed in black mysteriously appeared out of nowhere.
You can write much more succinctly when using descriptive words, and not empty ones to start a story or sentence or paragraph.
Exceptions are:
The Charles Dickens line: It was the best of times. It was the worst of times. I see no way to improve on that – or emulate it.
Also:  It was a dark and stormy night, coined by the Victorian writer, Edward Bulwer-Lytton in his 1830 novel Paul Clifford. Surely, you wouldn’t write: A dark and stormy night had overtaken us. Or would you?
Sentences beginning with It, especially beginning entire books, had their places in yesteryear’s prose. Such lackadaisical nondescript expressions are not acceptable in the descriptive writing demanded of these modern times.

Tip #4 – The First Word of a Story
The first word of the first sentence of the first paragraph under the story title must grab attention. The first sentence must sustain the attention, and on through the first paragraph. If the first word or sentence is boring, or says nothing in particular, the readers’ expectations of a good story are killed.
What effect does this sentence have on your expectations?
It was a quiet town with quiet people.
Does that give you any idea at all as to what the story might be about? As far as the reader knows from that line, nothing happens in that town. Boring.
You can use the word The to begin anywhere, but what follows must then become the attention grabber.
Here’s an example of starting with The from my adventure novel, Legacy of The Tropics:
The jagged scar on Pablo’s belly wriggled like a snake when he ran.

Here’s the attention grabber from my paranormal Egyptian suspense, The Ka:
“Witch!” Randy Osborne said as he strode around the room wearing a contemptible smirk.
And from my award-winning thriller, River Bones:
Blood-red letters filled the top of the monitor screen: Serial Killer Victim Identified.
Then from another of my next thrillers, Down to the Needle:
“The perp torched himself,” a fireman said, shouting to be heard over the clamor.
Whether narration or dialogue, start your stories with words and action that pull the reader into the scene.

Tip #5 - Use of the Passive Voice
Passive voice should be used with serious consideration as to how it affects your story.
A bad example: The house was cleaned by someone else. Here, the object of the action is incorrectly the subject of the sentence.
A good example: Someone else cleaned the house. Someone else did the action. That person should be the subject of the sentence. Ask yourself who or what is doing the action. They are the subject of the sentence. The action they are performing should not be the subject.
Passive voice can best be used, and sparingly, when writing in first person. Example: I was hit by the car.

Tip #6 – A Rejection for a Comma
My former publishing house editor returned my manuscript again after I made most of the changes suggested in the first edit. The editor referred me to the Chicago Manual of Style and told me to get it right.
Can you find what’s wrong with this sentence?
He mumbled as if confused, tried the knob, grunted and tried again.
The Chicago Manual of Style (Page 173 of my 14th Edition) says: 5.57 - In a series consisting of three or more elements, the elements are separated by commas. When a conjunction joins the last two elements in a series, a comma is used before the conjunction.
Therefore the corrected sentence is:
He mumbled as if confused, tried the knob, grunted, and tried again.
Did you spot the correction? Can you sense the difference as you read it?
In order to avoid rejections, the grammar in your story must conform to the rules, especially since knowing that publishers adhere to the Chicago Manual of Style.

Tip #7 – Avoid Splitting Infinitives
Be conscious of any form of to be. A great example of a split infinitive is: To boldly go where no man….
Everyone knows that line. It just doesn’t sound right to use: To go boldly where no man….
Look at these two:
“To be, or not to be.”
“To be, or to not be.”
Though split infinitives are a matter of style, incorrect usage at the wrong time can ruin a good story and make the writer seem like an amateur. Contradictory, incorrect usage at the right time can set your prose apart from all the rest. It can be done, but seldom. How many writers have produced lines of narration or dialogue that can compare to that line from Star Trek?

Tip #8 – Edit and Revise
We MUST edit and revise as many times as necessary to get it right. Otherwise, what could we expect but another rejection? Knowing if a story is right comes with experience of editing our own work as if it were someone else's prose.
Once writers think their stories are finished and polished, even though they may have had a great edit, they refuse to go through another rewrite. Then, I ask, what's the sense of having the piece edited? I edited major portions of my entire Ka novel manuscript - 885 manuscript pages (410 book pages) - a minimum of 30 times over four years and stopped counting after that.
Point is, the story had to be right before anyone other than my personal editors saw it. All of that happened before the publisher's editor saw it. Then there were two more edits following that person's sage advice.
Most of us writers are not English majors with PhD’s. No matter how good we believe our writing to be, editing is the only means to perfecting our craft.

Tip #9 - Reference Books
Get yourself a current copy of The Chicago Manual of Style: The Essential Guide for Writers, Editors and Publishers. I also recommend the Complete Stylist Handbook by Sheridan Baker and Writing with Clarity and Style by Robert A. Harris.



  BIO:

Mary Deal is an award-winning author of suspense/thrillers, a short story collection, writers' references, and self-help. She is a Pushcart Prize nominee, Artist and Photographer, and former newspaper columnist and magazine editor.

She has traveled most of her life and has a lifetime of many and diverse experiences, all of which remain in memory as fodder for her fiction. A native of California's Sacramento River Delta, where some of her stories are set, she has also lived in England, the Caribbean, and now resides in Honolulu, Hawaii. Having traveled a bit, she continues to paint and use her art and photography to create gorgeous products.

            LINK TO AMAZON AUTHOR PAGE

           LINK TO SMASHWORDS AUTHOR PAGE



Thursday, February 23, 2017

Unfolding the Mystery of Self




Unfolding the Mystery of Self
"Some of us walk a unique, decidedly spiritual path. By choice, some us create a spiritual life without religion and stand on our own. In my case, I have chosen a path to Christ consciousness or enlightenment." ~Lynne Cockrum-Murphy
​As the illusion of the material world melts, communion with angels, ancestors, teachers and masters becomes common place when Lynne Cockrum-Murphy shows we are all guided throughout our lives. This awareness and self-realization is available to anyone who seeksUnfolding the Mystery of Self - We Are Never Alone is a descriptive illustration of the author's development of her spiritual path, intuitive awareness and deep inner peace. In an easy-to-read style, this book illuminates transition from her early life traumas and discouragement to gracious awareness of All That Is. Sharing wisdom from spiritual teachers and insights from mystical experiences, the possibilities beyond our physical lives become real.
PO Box 1223, Conifer, CO 80433

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Tuesday, February 21, 2017

What you don't see behind the glitter & glitz of contemporary award shows






What you don't see behind the glitter & glitz of contemporary award shows
A bold Behind-the-Scenes Tell-All About How Talented Artists
and Athletes Are Mentally and Physically Killed
by Badly Behaving Fans, Families, Teachers and Coaches
who Deify, Vilify and Crucify Our Stars.
Healthier Ways to Mentor the Talented
and Bring Healing to Our Culture



Lisa Loving Dalton, a forty-year veteran of the entertainment industry, dares to pull back the curtain of tinsel town to examine some very gritty facts.


What stands out in her new book Murder Of Talent: How Pop Culture Is Killing "IT" is the no-holds-barred assay she makes on the fans, the families, mentors and the talented ones revealing the dangers that exist. An easy and dynamic read, with something for everyone, this messy memoir, part uncensored social diatribe, part gentle master class on the nature of peak performance and how to achieve it in a way that is good for the fans and for our heroes.


Dalton puts us all on trial for the death and destruction of our stars, our wannanbes, our selves and our culture. She calls for the arrest of some and even judges herself guilty of self-violence for allowing a famous coach to destroy her film-acting career. Then, with empathy and wisdom, Lisa gently steps us along a path to redemption with tips for each of us on how to stop the metaphoric and actual bloodshed, leading us to happier, healthier lives.

Endorsed by a Clinical Psychologist and a Tony Award-winning Producer, with a foreword by noted scholar/author Dr. Sharon Carnicke, Dalton courageously shares painful true stories of how she and fellow artists were indoctrinated in PTSD-inducing techniques. The knife is further twisted when we understand this destruction is still propagated by academia and manipulative super coaches, some making over a million dollars a year as they drain the pockets of penniless actors and a few superstars to boot.

No wonder stars are killing themselves with sex, drugs and other bad behavior.

Perhaps the most publicly provocative aspect of this book is how children are traumatized into denying their talent by parents, teachers, and peers. Parents fear economic and social instability, and even attach homophobia to talent, refusing to support their children in non-math/science careers, forcing them away from what they love and into other fields where they suffer, fail and take a toll on society. Dalton reveals what it takes to survive humiliation in the classroom, harassment and jealousy from friends, self-doubt and parental disapproval.


PO Box 1223, Conifer, CO 80433

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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

The First Time Writer


 
Some people seem unable to get a first story started no matter how many exciting plots they have rattling around in the attic. The advice given in some articles is meant to motivate would-be authors to begin. That same advice is sought by those already established in their careers and wishing to improve their talents.
You will...
·         have a story when you begin and then finish writing it.
·         develop your voice after you begin to write.
·         thoroughly understand character development when you realize how much fun it is to create story people.
·         learn all aspects of building a story. It happens naturally as you recognize your need to know more about composition.
·         learn to edit your work to perfection and will realize that the editing process begins from the moment you start to formulate sentences, paragraphs and then chapters.
·         discover ways to polish your prose and make it uniquely yours.
·         learn how to promote yourself even if thinking yourself a wallflower.
 
However, none of this can happen unless you reach the point of starting that first story. I would love to hear success stories from anyone who was helped by the advice in this book. I would wish everyone luck, but it's not a matter of luck. It's a matter of letting go of all the reasons for not writing and then getting started. It's as simple as that.
 
 
 BIO:

Mary Deal is an award-winning author of suspense/thrillers, a short story collection, writers' references, and self-help. She is a Pushcart Prize nominee, Artist and Photographer, and former newspaper columnist and magazine editor.

She has traveled most of her life and has a lifetime of many and diverse experiences, all of which remain in memory as fodder for her fiction. A native of California's Sacramento River Delta, where some of her stories are set, she has also lived in England, the Caribbean, and now resides in Honolulu, Hawaii. Having traveled a bit, she continues to paint and use her art and photography to create gorgeous products.

            LINK TO AMAZON AUTHOR PAGE

           LINK TO SMASHWORDS AUTHOR PAGE



Author, Painter, Photographer
Eric Hoffer Book Award Winner
National Indie Excellence Book Awards Finalist (past)
Pushcart Prize Nominee
Global eBook Awards Nominee
2014 National Indie Excellence Book Awards Finalist
Global eBook Awards Bronze
Global eBook Awards Silver
Art Gallery: http://www.MaryDealFineArt.com
Gift Gallery: zazzle.com/IslandImageGallery*